Archaeologists race against time to save 1,300-year-old shipwreck in France

0
54

Archaeologists are in a race against time to save a 1,300-year-old shipwreck in France that is so fragile the air can destroy the wooden remains.

The 40-foot-long boat carcass, which was unearthed near Bordeaux, is made of beams that have not been in contact with oxygen or light for some time, causing them to dehydrate and split.

However, crews douse the beams with water every 30 minutes until each of the approximately 200 pieces can be carefully removed and submerged in water.

The boat’s final resting place has yet to be decided – the wooden beams could be resin injected to preserve it or the wreckage could be reburied where it was found, archaeologists say.

Archaeologists are in a race against time to save a 1,300-year-old shipwreck in France that is so fragile the air can destroy the wooden remains

The remains of the boat were first discovered in 2013, but have just been completely exposed above a silty creek bed.

The ship is dated between 680 and 720 and is believed to have been used to ship goods across an ancient arm of the Garonne, which is a river in southwestern France and northern Spain.

See also  UN chief: Government inaction on climate is 'dangerous'

But archaeologists say the ship was strong enough to travel to the Atlantic coast.

According to Inrap, the institute involved in the work, the wreckage will be cleared and documented by photographic surveys, 3D restitution, topography and recording of the various pieces of wood. It will be dismantled and numbered piece by piece.

The 40-foot-long boat carcass, which was unearthed near Bordeaux, is made of beams that have not been in contact with oxygen or light for some time, causing them to dehydrate and split.

The 40-foot-long boat carcass, which was unearthed near Bordeaux, is made of beams that have not been in contact with oxygen or light for some time, causing them to dehydrate and split.

However, crews douse the beams with water every 30 minutes until each of the approximately 200 pieces can be carefully removed and submerged in water.

However, crews douse the beams with water every 30 minutes until each of the approximately 200 pieces can be carefully removed and submerged in water.

The ship is dated between 680 and 720 and is believed to have been used to ship goods in an ancient arm of the Garonne, which is a river in southwestern France and northern Spain.

The ship is dated between 680 and 720 and is believed to have been used to ship goods in an ancient arm of the Garonne, which is a river in southwestern France and northern Spain.

“This dismantling will allow a detailed analysis of the construction of the boat, an essential operation to determine the naval architectural tradition to which it is attached.”

Laurent Grimbert, who is leading the institute’s excavations, told NBC News: “The excavations and dismantling of the wreckage should be completed by mid-September. For now, we are on schedule and each dismantled piece of wood teaches us more about the shipbuilding techniques of the High Middle Ages.

See also  American captives Alexander Drueke and Andy Huynh surface in Russian propaganda videos

The wreck discovered in France may be old, but a more recent wreck inspired the 1985 classic “The Goonies”.

The boat's final resting place has yet to be decided - the wooden beams could be resin injected to preserve it or the wreckage could be reburied where it was found, archaeologists say

The boat’s final resting place has yet to be decided – the wooden beams could be resin injected to preserve it or the wreckage could be reburied where it was found, archaeologists say

Wreck found in France may be old, but newer wreck inspired 1985 classic

The wreck discovered in France may be old, but a more recent wreck inspired the 1985 classic “The Goonies”. Marine archaeologists have recovered timbers from the hull of the 17th-century Spanish galleon Santo Cristo de Burgos from sea caves in Oregon

Marine archaeologists have recovered timbers from the hull of the 17th-century Spanish galleon Santo Cristo de Burgos from sea caves in Oregon.

The ship is said to have inspired Steve Spielberg’s cult adventure film, in which a group of children follow a treasure map leading to a pirate’s fortune.

Jim Delgado, an archaeological researcher and senior vice president at cultural resource management firm SEARCH Inc, told National Geographic: “These antlers are physical evidence of the stories known and passed down from generation to generation.”

A written account from 1813 tells of a Spanish Manila galleon that was wrecked in the late 1600s near Neahkahnie Mountain.

Native tribes also passed down the legend of a ship that disappeared off the Oregon coast around 1693, carrying porcelain, beeswax, and Chinese silk.

These were backed by mysterious lumps of beeswax that would continue to appear along the shore of Nehalem Bay throughout the 19th century.

Legends of lost treasures were widely reported in Oregon newspapers in the late 20th century and are said to have caught the attention of director Steven Spielberg.

This sparked the idea for “The Goonies”, where a troupe of children discover a treasure map that leads them to the long-lost fortune of One-Eyed Willy, a 17th-century pirate who hid his bounty on his vessel.

.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here