Married At First Sight’s Martha Kalifatidis Reveals She Still Doesn’t Have a Baby Belly After 17 Weeks zwangerschap

0
109

Married At First Sight’s Martha Kalifatidis Still Has No Baby Bump At 17 Weeks Of Pregnancy After Being Diagnosed With Hyperemesis Gravidarum

Martha Kalifatidis revealed on Wednesday that at 17 weeks of pregnancy, she has not yet developed a baby bump.

The former Married At First Sight star, 34, posted a video to Instagram of herself wearing a white sports bra posing in front of a mirror.

She emphasized her shapely tummy from several angles and noted that she hadn’t had a baby bump yet.

Martha Kalifatidis (pictured) revealed on Wednesday that she has not yet developed a baby belly after 17 weeks of pregnancy

Martha gave her followers a close-up of her athletically muscular midriff to indicate that she had yet to show many physical signs related to pregnancy.

However, she admitted that while her size had not visibly increased, she had noticed other physical changes.

See also  Planning major sporting events is SEKIST, study claims

“I’m definitely looking wider down the middle, maybe that’s something,” she wrote.

Martha posted an Instagram video highlighting her shapely tummy from different angles to show that she wasn't showing many physical signs yet associated with pregnancy

Martha posted an Instagram video highlighting her shapely tummy from different angles to show that she wasn’t showing many physical signs yet associated with pregnancy

Earlier this week, Martha gave candid insight into how her battle with an acute form of morning sickness has affected her pregnancy.

Martha, who is expecting her first child with fiancé Michael Brunelli, said Sunday that being diagnosed with hyperemesis gravidarum changed everything.

She told The Daily Telegraph that her symptoms had manifested themselves in countless painful ways.

The former Married At First Sight star gave her followers a close-up of her athletic-toned midriff to indicate she hasn't shown many physical signs of pregnancy yet.

Martha is expecting her first child with fiancé Michael Brunelli. The couple recently had to cut their European vacation short after Martha was bedridden by illness

“It’s like having gastro, you’re hungover, and you’re on a boat. This is anything but fun,” she said.

She explained that she wasn’t diagnosed until a month into her pregnancy, forcing her and Michael to cut their European vacation short.

See also  Gemma Owen shows off her tight midriff in a beige crop top and cargo pants in sizzling PLT snaps

“I was stuck abroad, severely dehydrated and had to drink regularly,” she said.

Martha is expecting her first child with fiancé Michael Brunelli (pictured).  The couple recently had to cut their European vacation short after Martha was bedridden by illness

Martha is expecting her first child with fiancé Michael Brunelli (pictured). The couple recently had to cut their European vacation short after Martha was bedridden by illness

The couple also shared shocking videos of Martha's multiple hospital and doctor visits

The couple also shared shocking videos of Martha’s multiple hospital and doctor visits

What is Hyperemesis Gravidarum?

Hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) is a condition that causes persistent and excessive vomiting during pregnancy.

Sufferers may be sick many times each day and unable to keep food or water down, impacting their daily lives.

It is unlikely to harm the baby, but if it causes a woman to lose weight during pregnancy, there is an increased risk of their baby having a low birth weight.

It’s different from nausea during pregnancy — often called morning sickness — which is normal and affects eight out of 10 pregnant women. For most, this stops or improves around weeks 16 to 20.

Meanwhile, HG may not get better at this point and it may take until the baby is born.

See also  Dave Hughes, 51, pledges to 'stop using a vape' on radio show

Symptoms of HG include prolonged and severe nausea and vomiting, dehydration, weight loss, and low blood pressure.

Being dehydrated increases your risk of a blood clot – deep vein thrombosis – but this is rare.

It’s not clear what causes the condition, or why some women get it and others don’t.

Some experts think it may be related to the changing hormones in the body that occur during pregnancy.

And there’s some evidence that it runs in families, and that women who had it during their first pregnancy are more likely to get it in subsequent pregnancies.

Women who suffer from HG may be given medications to improve their symptoms, such as anti-nausea medications, vitamins B6 and B12, and steroids.

Some women need to be hospitalized if their nausea cannot be controlled with medication at home.

They may need fluids and anti-disease medications to be given through an IV.

Source: NHS

Advertisement

.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here