Sports Illustrated hit out for story claiming Supreme Court ruling on prayer could erode ‘American democracy’

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Sports Illustrated (SI) was lambasted on Monday for what many Twitter users saw as a biased view of an upcoming Supreme Court religious liberty case.

The sports magazine promoted a post on its Twitter account written by Greg Bishop that discussed the case involving high school football coach Joe Kennedy’s right to pray on the field after a game. Although the case has yet to be decided, Sports Illustrated warned that a decision in Kennedy’s favor would be “an erosion of a foundation of American democracy.”

“SCOTUS will soon rule on the case of a public school football coach who wants to pray on the field after games. @GregBishopSI on Joe Kennedy, the machine behind him and the expected outcome: a win for Kennedy and an erosion of a bedrock of American Democracy,” the post read.

WASHINGTON, DC – APRIL 25: Former Bremerton High School assistant football coach Joe Kennedy answers questions after his legal case, Kennedy v Bremerton School District, was argued in Supreme Court on April 25, 2022 in Washington , DC. Kennedy was fired by Bremerton Public School officials in 2015 after refusing to stop his prayers on the field after football games.
(Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

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The tweet echoed the assertion in Bishop’s article which opened: “The United States Supreme Court will soon rule on the case of a football coach at a public high school who has been told that he was not allowed to pray on the pitch in front of the players. the result is a victory for the coach – and the further erosion of the separation between church and state.”

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Several Twitter accounts called the description “nonsense” and a terrible take on the Supreme Court by the sports magazine.

Federalism editor Mollie Hemingway tweeted, “‘Religious freedom is both the thing the country is built on and a threat to democracy,’ that’s for sure.”

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Attorney Casey Mattox wrote, “Actually, no. It’s not an erosion of a foundation of democracy if the government can’t punish people for praying. It’s a bad take.”

A football player prays on the sidelines before a game.

A football player prays on the sidelines before a game.
(Stock)

Rep. Chip Roy’s, R-Texas, Director of Communications Nate Madden tweeted, “SI speaks out against First Amendment and public prayer when eroding ‘democracy bedrock’ is certainly a choice. .”

“Tell me you never read the Constitution without telling me you never read the Constitution,” wrote Grabien founder Tom Elliot.

Washington Examiner magazine editor Jay Caruso quoted the opening of the article and dubbed it “Total nonsense”.

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Kennedy v. Bremerton School District is due in June. Although the Supreme Court has blocked cases involving prayers in the past, many have speculated that the now 6-3 conservative majority could rule in favor of Kennedy.

FILE - On this April 23, 2021, members of the Supreme Court's file photo pose for a group photo at the Supreme Court in Washington.  Seated from left are Associate Justice Samuel Alito, Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, Chief Justice John Roberts, Associate Justice Stephen Breyer and Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left are Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh, Associate Justice Elena Kagan , Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch and Associate Justice Amy Coney Barrett.  (Erin Schaff/The New York Times via AP, pool, file)

FILE – On this April 23, 2021, members of the Supreme Court’s file photo pose for a group photo at the Supreme Court in Washington. Seated from left are Associate Justice Samuel Alito, Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, Chief Justice John Roberts, Associate Justice Stephen Breyer and Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left are Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh, Associate Justice Elena Kagan , Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch and Associate Justice Amy Coney Barrett. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times via UKTN, pool, file)

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Since news that the Supreme Court would take up the case in April, other liberal media outlets have expressed concern that a ruling in Kennedy’s favor could lead to the end of “separation from the Church.” and State”, a concept not envisioned by the Founders at the time of the ratification of the Bill of Rights.

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